LATE FIFTEENTH CENTURY
Indonesia supposedly formed a single state centred in Madjapahit,
whose spirit must therefore be revived to inspire the creation of an
even more glorious Indonesia in the future. In so far as such
thinking was fostered by recourse to Madjapahit poetry for the new
national slogan Bhinneka tunggal ika (unity in diversity) and by
naming the new national airline - itself a most potent agent of
unification - after the
garuda bird, a symbol of Madjapahit, this was
all to the good. But the way in which school textbooks and official
handbooks continued to present as fact a highly misleading account of
the vast though vaguely defined extent of the Madjapahit empire was
insidiously dangerous. For, intentionally or otherwise, it lent
support to the expansionist aspirations of Muhammad Yamin and others,
whose vision of Indonesia Raya (Greater Indonesia) embraced not
merely the existing republic and West Irian, but also such outlying
'Malayo-Polynesian' lands as Malaysia, the Philippines, and
Madagascar. And although for many years such aspirations were firmly
disclaimed at the official level, increasingly flamboyant official
gestures like unilaterally changing the name of the Indian Ocean to
the Indonesian Ocean, the erection of spectacular monuments and other
status symbols in Djakarta, and above all the rapid build-up, with
the help of a massive loan from the Soviet bloc, of the military,
naval, and air forces, ostensibly for the final solution of the Irian
problem, suggested by the late 1950s that the perpetrators of the
national mythology had fallen under their own spell.



EAST GORDON W, SPATE O.H.K, FISHER CHARLES, THE CHANGING MAP OF ASIA A POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY,
                      METHUEN & CO LTD, 1971 ENGLAND PGS 233 & 302.
    INDONESIA

                            MADJAPAHIT--TIMOR
picture taken by josef majid jr